Mentoring: “Private Plein Air Painting Intensive Study” Program Report 3



Turnaround 9×12 Oil by Michael Chesley Johnson
Available

What a week it was!  After our first day of very fine weather, the second day saw our town smothered by smoke from a prescribed burn 20 miles away.  We had quarter-mile visibility, if that.  By the time we got to painting, the smoke began to lift, but it still made for a hazy day with weak shadows.  Then a couple of days later, a wind storm blew through with 70 mile-an-hour gusts.  However, we found a side canyon where the wind couldn’t touch us.  By lunchtime, though, the valley was blinded by airborne dust.  It was almost as bad as the smoke.  Then, during the night, the prescribed burn blew up into not one but two 1000-acre wildfires.  Fortunately, they lay to the northeast (and sent a vast plume of smoke 134 miles away to Los Alamos, the scene of another prescribed-fire-gone-bad back in 2000.)  Finally, our last day, the wind brought a gentle dusting of snow and temperatures nearly 40 degrees lower than what we’d seen earlier in the week.

Find the Painter!


Despite all the excitement, we had a wonderful week.  Jodi and I focused mostly on painting rocky cliffs, since that is what attracted her most, and also worked on her skills of simplifying complex shapes.  Jodi and her husband, Don, did not stay with us but took the tuition-only option, enjoying a stay in their RV with their two small dogs at the campground at El Morro National Monument.  (The full package, which includes lodging and meals, is $1400, the tuition-only option is $700. Full details at www.paintthesouthwest.com.)  Now that the week is done, Jodi and Don are off on a special painting project via RV, the details of which Jodi will announce in the future.

Jodi and  Don’s RV — plus the Razr for painting places seldom seen

Location shot for my painting at the top of the post

Jodi hard at work

Now that the final week for our season has ended, Trina and I are off on our journey east.  First stop:  A painting retreat Ghost Ranch in Abiquiu, New Mexico, and then Santa Fe, where I have been invited to be a guest of the Plein Air Convention and Expo.  Then, it’s off to Indiana for a second painting retreat in Brown County, home of the late painter T.C. Steele.  And finally—Campobello Island, Canada!  Workshops in Downeast Maine very soon. Visit www.pleinairpaintingmaine.com for details.

Window in the Rock 10×12 Oil by Michael Chesley Johnson
Available

Secret Cliff 12×9 Oil by Michael Chesley Johnson
Available

Morning Cliff Shadows 8×6 Oil by Michael Chesley Johnson
Available

Juniper Shadows 6×8 Oil by Michael Chesley Johnson
Available


Michael Chesley Johnson, AIS PSA MPAC PSNM
www.MChesleyJohnson.com

Mentoring: “Private Plein Air Painting Intensive Study” Program Report 3


Turnaround 9×12 Oil by Michael Chesley Johnson
Available

What a week it was!  After our first day of very fine weather, the second day saw our town smothered by smoke from a prescribed burn 20 miles away.  We had quarter-mile visibility, if that.  By the time we got to painting, the smoke began to lift, but it still made for a hazy day with weak shadows.  Then a couple of days later, a wind storm blew through with 70 mile-an-hour gusts.  However, we found a side canyon where the wind couldn’t touch us.  By lunchtime, though, the valley was blinded by airborne dust.  It was almost as bad as the smoke.  Then, during the night, the prescribed burn blew up into not one but two 1000-acre wildfires.  Fortunately, they lay to the northeast (and sent a vast plume of smoke 134 miles away to Los Alamos, the scene of another prescribed-fire-gone-bad back in 2000.)  Finally, our last day, the wind brought a gentle dusting of snow and temperatures nearly 40 degrees lower than what we’d seen earlier in the week.

Find the Painter!


Despite all the excitement, we had a wonderful week.  Jodi and I focused mostly on painting rocky cliffs, since that is what attracted her most, and also worked on her skills of simplifying complex shapes.  Jodi and her husband, Don, did not stay with us but took the tuition-only option, enjoying a stay in their RV with their two small dogs at the campground at El Morro National Monument.  (The full package, which includes lodging and meals, is $1400, the tuition-only option is $700. Full details at www.paintthesouthwest.com.)  Now that the week is done, Jodi and Don are off on a special painting project via RV, the details of which Jodi will announce in the future.

Jodi and  Don’s RV — plus the Razr for painting places seldom seen

Location shot for my painting at the top of the post

Jodi hard at work

Now that the final week for our season has ended, Trina and I are off on our journey east.  First stop:  A painting retreat Ghost Ranch in Abiquiu, New Mexico, and then Santa Fe, where I have been invited to be a guest of the Plein Air Convention and Expo.  Then, it’s off to Indiana for a second painting retreat in Brown County, home of the late painter T.C. Steele.  And finally—Campobello Island, Canada!  Workshops in Downeast Maine very soon. Visit www.pleinairpaintingmaine.com for details.

Window in the Rock 10×12 Oil by Michael Chesley Johnson
Available

Secret Cliff 12×9 Oil by Michael Chesley Johnson
Available

Morning Cliff Shadows 8×6 Oil by Michael Chesley Johnson
Available

Juniper Shadows 6×8 Oil by Michael Chesley Johnson
Available


Michael Chesley Johnson, AIS PSA MPAC PSNM
www.MChesleyJohnson.com

Creative Irish Curlews


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There is an extraordinary passage in What the Curlew Said – Nostos Continued by the Irish writer and philosopher John Moriarty.
It would be a tragedy then, to allow the Curlew, a bird that has provided so much inspiration, to slip away. If Ireland allows the curlew to fall silent, it loses so much more than just another species, it loses part of Irish heritage. In the late 1980s there were around 5,000 curlews breeding throughout the country, they were a common sight and anyone over the age of 40 will remember them. Ireland has a long and rich connection to nature, the roots are there, they only need be nurtured once again for Ireland to be truly green and full of life.  Bringing back the Curlew from the brink of extinction as a breeding bird will be a huge positive step towards a brighter future for all of life on the Emerald Isle.

World Curlew Day is on April 21, my book Curlew Moon is out on April 19, published by William Collins.

Oh – and the fabulous World Curlew Day logo was designed by my cousin Nicola Duffy from Letterkenny!


The Twinkling Tree | Corrina Askin at Roe Valley Arts and Cultural Centre, Limavady


30 September to 11 November 2017

Artist and illustrator Corrina Askin exhibits an exciting brand-new body of work related to two brand-new animation series. The Twinkling Tree is a concept which centres on Jude and the characters who live in a fabulous walled garden. Guided by her friends, Mr. Bones, and Wobbly Bob, she could get lost in conversation at the Bridge of a Thousand Beards or learn to speak in pictures with Hoppy or end up flying in a hot air balloon with The Fearless Boy. The Twinkling Tree is a uniquely eccentric and beautiful show for pre-schoolers about the magic of discovery, trusting in the universe and following your own path in life. Corrina is currently in discussions with a leading animation company to develop this concept further.

Louis and How to Just Be is a feel good emotional guide for 12 years to adult. Louis is for those minutes when we get stuck. Humour helps us shift gear and let a ‘hard moment’ pass. Louis and How to Just Be is about stillness, curiosity, and love and not taking ourselves too seriously. It will appear on the CBeebies/ CBBC social media platform in autumn 2017.

Roe Valley Arts and Cultural Centre
24 Main St, Limavady
T: +44 (0)28 7776 0650
E: information@rvacc.co.uk
W: roevalleyarts.com

SYSCO SOFTWARE OFFICIAL MICROSOFT DYNAMICS 365 PROVIDER TO STATSPORTS


Left to Right: Tony Brown (Microsoft Dynamics ERP Commercial Lead, Sysco Software Solutions), Paul McKernan, (Chief Information Officer, STATSports)

Sysco Software Official Microsoft Dynamics 365 Provider to STATSports

Sysco Software’s Microsoft Dynamics 365 cloud implementation to transform STATSports Financials, Business Insights, E-Commerce and Customer Service

Sysco Software Solutions are delighted to announce their status as official Microsoft Dynamics 365 provider to STATSports, with a full cloud ready implementation of Microsoft Dynamics providing a platform for growth across their business accounts and financials, stock management, business analytics, e-commerce and customer service applications.

STATSports is a fast growing, world-leading provider of GPS player tracking and analysis equipment with offices located in Ireland, London and Chicago.

“For a business growing as fast as STATSports, we had many challenges that needed to be addressed. We identified that we needed one system, Microsoft Dynamics 365, to collate, transact and report all of our stock and financial information.” said Paul McKernan, Chief Information Officer at STATSports.

Paul McKernan, CIO at STATSports continued, “From the initial briefings and specifications, it was clear that the team at Sysco Software Solutions clearly understood many of the challenges we had, even those that were quite unique. Sysco understood our business quickly, listened to our requests and then provided solutions. This was a key factor in our decision to aligning our business with Sysco Software Solutions.”

Tony Brown, Microsoft Dynamics ERP Commercial Lead at Sysco Software Solutions added, “STATSports are a unique business, yet there are many synergies between us.” Tony continued, “We both provide business intelligence applications to customers who strive for excellence. Sysco’s implementation of Microsoft Azure, Microsoft Dynamics 365 / NAV and Power BI will deliver to STATSports a platform of agility and insight required for such a fast-growing and successful business.”

Paul McKernan, CIO at STATSports continued, “The foundations we have with Azure, Microsoft Dynamics 365 / NAV and Power BI will allow us to grow and be fully mobile to meet the needs of our worldwide customer base. At STATSports we focus on efficiencies and performance as part of the market we are in but more important to us is to ensure we harness technology to provide the best service to our customers, and we see Microsoft Dynamics and Sysco Software Solutions as helping us do that.”

For more information regarding any solution or project please contact marketing@sysco-software.com

About Sysco Software Solutions

Established in 1980 in Dublin, Sysco employs over 80 people in Ireland and Northern Ireland delivering service and support from our offices in Dublin and Belfast. Sysco brought Microsoft Dynamics to Ireland, and has the largest client base (over 300 client installations).

Sysco provides software solutions to many organisations, consistently delivering integrated business solutions that work. Sysco view each client as having a full life-cycle from the system consultation stage, through to the final implementation and on-going support, consequently, building a strong relationship and a commitment to serving the client’s evolving needs.

The post SYSCO SOFTWARE OFFICIAL MICROSOFT DYNAMICS 365 PROVIDER TO STATSPORTS appeared first on Sysco Software Solutions.

Es trieft aus jedem Wort und man sieht es an jedem…


Es trieft aus jedem Wort und man sieht es an jedem einzelnen Bild, wie sehr Du diese Landschaft liebst.
Dein letzter Satz ist völlig richtig, über every one of unserem Entzücken vergessen wir dann die Beschwerlichkeiten, die gerade solche abgelegenen, einsamen Gegenden für die Menschen bereithielten. Trotzdem müssen wir heute dankbar sein, wenn wir noch solche idyllischen Fleckchen antreffen.
Wäre ich eine Fee, würde ich Dir für diesen schönen Information jetzt ein “Lia Fail” herbeibeamen, oder auch zwei, oder drei…!!!
LG Wurzerl, nicht neidisch, aber trotzdem, auch hinwill!!!

Du sprichst mir aus dem Herzen mit deinem Loblied …


Du sprichst mir aus dem Herzen mit deinem Loblied auf die schottische Landschaft. Bin ebenfalls bekennende Schottlandfan(in)…allerdings ohne grosse Liebe zum Whisky oder Bier (dafür hat man dann den Mann ;-)!!). Liebe Grüsse, Barbara

Hey Allipalli!Schön, dass Du wieder da bist! :)Sti…


Hey Allipalli!

Schön, dass Du wieder da bist! :)
Stimmungsvolle Bilder sind das von Eurer Schottland Reise, da möchte ich auch mal hin.
Italien war wunderschön, gebloggt habe ich aber bisher nur über Vendig, meine neue Lieblingsstadt, wo wir 2 x mittendrin übernachtet haben. Es ist alles so inspirierend dort. Jetzt geht es morgen früh schon wieder auf nach Athen.

Liebe Grüße und eine schöne Woche wünsch ich Dir!

Carola xox

Upcoming Plein Air Painting Workshop at Acadia Workshop Center, Bernard, Maine



Many people travel to Acadia National Park on Mount Desert Island in the summer.  This summer will probably see record numbers.  But there’s a little-known, quiet side to the island, and that’s where I love to teach my plein air painting workshop.

Bernard, Maine, is home to the Acadia Workshop Center, where I have been teaching almost every year since 2005.  I love this place, because it’s a great facility for when we need to be indoors, and it’s very close to some very beautiful (and quiet!) spots on the island.  When I teach there, it’s always a special week for me.  We paint boats and harbor scenes, quiet marshes and crashing waves on the seawall.  Plus, one of the highlights is lunch or dinner at famous Thurston’s Lobster Pound.  I can’t wait to go again this year.

This year’s dates are August 21-24, 2018.  For details and to register, please visit the Acadia Workshop Center site here: http://www.acadiaworkshopcenter.com/MCJohnson.html.  I hope you’ll join us.

(By the way, if the dates for this workshop don’t work for you, I do have a few spots left in my Lubec, Maine, plein air painting workshops.  Please check out www.PleinAirPaintingMaine.com for details.)







Michael Chesley Johnson, AIS PSA MPAC PSNM
www.MChesleyJohnson.com

Curlew Country Visit


It was a bitter-sweet visit to the Curlew Country project in Shropshire on June 12th. It was a baking hot day, and for a couple of hours before lunch Amanda Perkins and Tony Cross from the project, Phil Sheldrake (RSPB), Mike Smart (ace birdwatcher) and myself tried to find three or four chicks that were somewhere in a large hay meadow. They had hatched from a nest that had been surrounded by an electric fence to protect it from predators like foxes and badgers. This is the first year the project has trialled fences and it has undoubtedly increased the survival of eggs.  Whether that success translates into more fledged chicks is yet to be seen. Curlew chicks have wanderlust in their blood and once they find their very large feet are fit for walking, they are off.  If they are not protected by electricity, they have to rely wholly on their parents to warn them of danger.

Mike Smart, Amanda Perkins and Phil Sheldrake

It’s a pretty good system though.  Vigilant, feisty and sneaky, curlews take parenting very seriously. Vigilant in that they can see danger approaching from a long way off, hundreds of metres, and begin yapping and barking in alarm. Feisty because it can be a full-on bombardment of sound, like being attacked with an audial machine gun. And sneaky as the alarming bird may well be quite a distance away from the chicks, leading the dangerous creature down a blind alley. Meanwhile the chicks have either sunk low into a ditch or depression, or they have legged it into impenetrable rushes – which is what they did on the day we visited.

Tony Cross

Trying to find small fluff balls in a vast meadow is not for the weak of spirit. Tony used a radio tracker to narrow down the options, which was a patch of wet rush near to the field boundary. Try as we might we couldn’t find them, and as standing on them is a real possibility, we gave up. I was disappointed in one way, but glad in another. I am relieved they are so hard to locate, because if we couldn’t find them, even armed with technology, then a fox will find it hard too.  Knowing they were there was sweet enough for me. The bleeps on the receiver were heart-lifting – I didn’t have to actually see them to feel delighted and relieved they are still in the wild. Every chick is precious, and three packages of preciousness are still in this hay meadow – or they were on Monday June 12th.
The bitter side of the visit is the knowledge that the chances of these chicks surviving is very slim. For the past two years all the chicks that managed to hatch in the project area were predated before a month was up. Curlew are adapted to high levels of mortality – each pair only needs to raise one chick every other year for a population to remain stable – but even this isn’t being met. Throughout the country, chicks and eggs are either being eaten by predators or killed by their other nemesis – agricultural machines.

Screen grab from Curlew Country curlew camera

In another field, this time a large grass field used for silage, Amanda showed us where at least three chicks were sliced up as silage was cut in early June. As each year a pair of curlews chose to nest was in a field used to provide food for cattle – they dice with death – literally. The eggs were protected by an electric fence, and so survived to hatching, but once the chicks wandered outside they became collateral damage to our farming system.  And this wasn’t the only brood to meet this fate. Out of 22 nests located in the Shropshire project area, 9 chicks were alive on the day we visited.

Looking at the silage field and knowing the fate of the chicks was a sad way to end the day, but it was also a heartening visit too. Curlews continue to come every year to this most beautiful part of Shropshire. Every Spring they try to nest in the same places – their ancestral homes. As long as they come back there is hope we can help them. There is no shortage of goodwill amongst farmers or volunteers, everyone loves curlews. But there is a mismatch between caring about a bird and doing what it takes to save it. Sometimes that mismatch is in a lack of understanding about what is actually needed, and it is surprising how little we know about a bird that was once so common.  Or it can be that money simply takes priority, and losing a silage crop is too expensive when life on a farm is stressed enough. Or maybe it is the dilemma posed by predator control. Some people, understandably, find it hard to accept that foxes and crows may have to die so that curlews can live.  Whatever the reason, curlews continue to decline across the UK at an alarming rate.

The Curlew Country project is inspirational and is doing a vital job in bringing into focus the enormous problems facing our largest wader. Nothing less than the might of UK farming, half a million badgers and foxes and a million crows bear down on them at the most fragile and vulnerable time of their lives. Curlew Country is working with everyone on the ground to find solutions, and until the last curlew calls, there is hope they will succeed in reversing the fortunes of this most wonderful and enigmatic of birds.

New Work | Ryan Burke at Roe Valley Arts & Cultural Centre, Limavady


30 September to 11 November 2017

Roe Valley Arts & Cultural Centre were thrilled to have actually recently discovered the work of Welsh sculptor Ryan Burke.Working from his studio in Belfast, Ryan makes the most extraordinary handcrafted, unique and quirky creatures and characters from found and recycled materials. From small robot characters made from recycled wood which are likewise lamps to crow-like sculptures, Ryan’s work takes the adult and child viewer into other worlds of fun and creativity, meeting strange, colourful characters and following narratives which ignite the imagination.

Roe Valley Arts and Cultural Centre
24 Main St, Limavady
T: 0044 28 7776 0650
E: information@rvacc.co.uk
W: roevalleyarts.com

Oh Al, ich will auch dahin. Das ist so traumhaft, …


Oh Al, ich will certainly auch dahin. Das ist so traumhaft, dass ich zerschmelzen könnte.
Danke, dass Du united state an Deiner Liebe zu dieser Landschaft so teilhaben lässt.

Danke Kati

Ach, da warst du also. Schoen, dass du mit so scho…


Ach, da warst du also. Schoen, dass du mit so schoenen Fotos wieder zurueck gekommen bist. Wie schcon soviele vor mir bemerkten, da muss ich auch noch unbedingt hin:) Es sieht nach dem perfekten Urlaub aus.
LG, Bek

Mentoring: “Private Plein Air Painting Intensive Study” Program Report 2



My output for the week, minus one

I just wrapped up another week of my Paint the Southwest Private Plein Air Painting Intensive Study program.  Hester came from Washington in the Pacific Northwest.  An experienced painter, she joined me the previous week in Sedona for my all-level workshop to see how I work before coming to New Mexico to study with me privately.  Now that this private week has finished, she is on her way to an artist residency at Parashant-Grand Canyon National Monument.



The week was in many ways similar to the week I reported on in my first post on the program, which you can read about here in detail.  We painted a great deal, talked much about art issues and enjoyed excellent weather.  The difference, however, was the focus on business—Hester wants to get better at marketing and thus selling her work.  I enjoyed helping her with creating an action plan for the near future.




All landscape painters enjoy nature when out in the field, but sometimes you have a special moment.  One day at the lake, besides the coots, mallards and herons that have lately returned, for the first time I saw a flock of snow geese.  They were pure elegance as they flew from one end of the lake to the other, feeding.  My camera couldn’t capture them, but we both enjoyed watching them.  I could write about many such special moments here, but I will leave you with a few photos from the week.

Hester painting at the El Calderon lava tubes.  She’s an
experienced caver and well knows the dangers of caving
as well as how to protect the environment.

By the way, if you are an experienced artist looking for this kind of one-on-one, intense experience, please take a look at my Paint the Southwest website at www.PaintTheSouthwest.com.  I am already taking registrations for Fall 2018 and Spring 2019.  I have a lot to offer, and I would like to help you reach the next level in your painting.

Time for a Hike – 8×16 oil – Available
(Ramah Lake)
by Michael Chesley Johnson

Up the Lake – 5.5 x 10.75 oil – Available
(Ramah Lake)
by Michael Chesley Johnson

Beautiful Canyon – 9×12 oil – Available
(Bonita Canyon)
by Michael Chesley Johnson

Ponderosa – 9×12 oil – Available
(Ramah Lake)
by Michael Chesley Johnson

Entrance – 8×10 oil – Available
(El Calderon Lava Tubes)
by Michael Chesley Johnson

Rock Top 1 – 6×8 oil – Available
(El Morro National Monument)
by Michael Chesley Johnson

Rock Top 2 – 6×8 oil – Available
(El Morro National Monument)
by Michael Chesley Johnson


Michael Chesley Johnson, AIS PSA MPAC PSNM
www.MChesleyJohnson.com

Hallo AL, da hab ich wieder was Neues über dich ge…


Hallo AL, da hab ich wieder was Neues über dich gelernt. Bekennende Biertrinkerin. Ich dachte bei dir eher an Rouge oder Whiskey ob mit oder ohne h.
Tolle Fotos von einer bezaubernden Landschaft. Diese endlos weiten Blicke in die Ferne liebe ich besonders.

VLG Gudi

Da war ich vor ein paar Wochen auch. Und das Castl…


Da war ich vor ein paar Wochen auch. Und das Castle habe ich auch gesehen. So ungewohnt weiß mitten in der Landschaft. Als wir dort waren, blühte die Heide und alles war lila. Traumhaft. Bilder sind in meinem Blog.Ich würde mich sofort wieder hinbeamen, wenn ich könnte.
LG Margrit

Curlews caught in the middle.


Today is my last “work” day in Ireland before I get to Dublin, apart from a radio interview tomorrow for Mooney Goes Wild.  As you can tell if you’ve been following me, bogs have been a big feature of this part of the Midlands.  Last night someone challenged me by saying – why is it different to what you did to get coal?  The industrialization of England destroyed vast areas and opencast mines in S Wales are just as bad to look at. An argument that needs addressing because it is true. There are the obvious answers – such as times have changed – really changed.  We know much more about how our activities affect the planet – and we have not just local but international obligations to protect the environment. So the milieu in which we make decisions is totally different.  What seemed a good use of resources in the past has shifted as the atmosphere fills with greenhouse gases and the diversity of life diminishes. Just because we did it then doesn’t mean we have the right to carry on.

So how will Ireland get its fuel if peat burning stops? (Which I doubt very much!) Gas is a more energy efficient fossil fuel than peat, by a very long way, and alternative sources are emerging all the time.  I really don’t like the term “green energy” it is a green-washing phrase.  There is no such thing  as a totally environmentally friendly way to produce power – they all have damaging effects – no free lunch – but some are certainly better than others.  Wind farms and solar farms, wave power and barrages come with their own baggage, but it is lighter than fossil fuels if dealt with well, but not cost free. Numerous people are working on this and I know it is difficult, but Ireland could be the leading light for Europe by laying aside peat and turning to the future, which will no doubt be a moisture of several forms of energy depending on location.  Peat is a fuel of the past, and that is a large part of the problem – the past speaks loud in Ireland.

This goes to the heart of the problem.  Tradition is a powerful force, it is linked in to a memory of days gone by when people cut their turf by hand and worked the land with a countryman’s heart (and it was usually men). Many, several people will tell you their parents and grandparents knew the wildlife and understood the seasons in a way that is alien today.  This understanding was laced with folktales and old stories about the way nature informs and warns humanity.  In a talk I gave yesterday one middle aged woman said when her mother heard a curlew she would go around the house waving a goose feather  (used as feather dusters) – as the call of the curlew was associated with the souls of drowned sailors.  Others nodded – they remembered that too. Help waft the souls out of the house and on towards heaven. The curlew, the waterways and the bog were interlinked. And the image of the men hand cutting turf on their patch, labouring away, stacking the “black butter” that Seamus Heaney refers to – “melting and opening underfoot,” is alive and thriving in the Irish imagination. Peat is part of Irelad’s memory but the memory of curlews is slipping away so fast, and if they are remembered there is no political purchase attached to them.

I remember traditional peat cutting well.  I have strong memories of visiting my uncle and aunt in Letterkenny in the 1960s and going with my dad and uncle to see turf cutting on the slopes of Muckinish Mountain. I remember the men bent over and the skill of slicing the turf with strange looking spades.  I remember them chatting next to the neatly stacked sods and then going to the pub for a Guinness and my dad saying to me later – try to remember this, it won’t last for ever.

My dear uncle has gone, and his plot on Muckinish.  Modern Ireland is not like that anymore.  Few cut by hand, it is done by a machine now. That link to working the land by hand is far less, but I can totally understand the family traditions stretching back through  generations.  Those are important memories, and if properly regulated the individual plots still have a place  in Ireland.  The problem is,
this has been scaled up out of all proportion from a family heating their home to a nation feeding power stations.  They are not the same thing.  The family stack is not the same as the trucks of peat railroaded out to be burnt in furnaces.

Yesterday I went out early to see some bog that still had a pair of curlews on it.  They were hanging on in a small section with peat diggers closing in fast from both sides.  Their call was tinged, for me, with desperation.  There is no way several of these birds that are settled in bogs that are continuing to be cut will survive the disturbance as the machines close in.

So Ireland has to decide what is important and what they want to remember and what they are happy to let go. Peat has a powerful place in Irish identity, it is political dynamite – people will loudly and vigorous defend this right to cut turf. But the curlew part of the tradition, the bird that serenaded the turf cutter, has faded away.  Does Ireland have a place for curlews for future generations? If so, how can they be treasured as a part of Irish tradition as much as cutting turf? In this land where tradition and modernity sit edge by side, curlews are squeezed out. They are the forgotten part of the past, can they find their way back into the  lives and loves of Ireland again? If so, they do have a future.

Artist Talk | Corrina Askin at Roe Valley Arts and Cultural Centre, Limavady


26 October 2017 at 2:00pm
Free admission but please book your place in advance.

Exhibiting artist Corrina Askin provides an informative and illustrated talk on her work and creative process as an illustrator and animation artist. Based in Belfast, Corrina trained at the Royal College of Art, London and has actually been commissioned by Channel 4, MTV, RTE and The Irish Film Board.

Over the last 10 years she has actually worked principally in creating work for children’s TV and media, including
the animated series, Joe and Jack (RTÉ) and Castle Farm (Milkshake). She currently has actually two series in pre-development with Brown Bag Films, Dublin and King Rollo, UK and has actually just illustrated five stories for the CBeebies Storytime App, (downloadable free from CBeebies website) Little Red Riding Hood, Cinderella, Alice in Wonderland, Nian and The Elephant and The Mouse.

In book illustration, Corrina has actually won awards from Bologna Children’s Book Fair, The Bisto Award for illustration and The Cle publishing award. She has actually also worked with Random House, O’Brien Press, as well as
several independents.

This is a wonderful opportunity for art students aged 16+ and creative practitioners to gain invaluable insight from Corrina on the creative media industries, how to cultivate and submit proposals and her own creative development.

Roe Valley Arts and Cultural Centre
24 Main St, Limavady
T: 0044 28 7776 0650
E: information@rvacc.co.uk
W: roevalleyarts.com

Looking for a Cool Place to Live? Historic Campobello Island Home.



1867 Cape on Campobello Island, New Brunswick, Canada

Trina and I have enjoyed living on Campobello Island for nearly 14 years now.  I can’t describe to you how peaceful and beautiful this Canadian oceanfront property is.  The nearly four acres, with raspberries and blackberries and a dozen or so apple trees, offers views of Friar’s Bay and Eastport, Maine.  Great horned owls have made their home in the tall spruces, and eagles fly over the grove of quaking aspen that line the bottom of the property.  When I walk our trail system that we have cut on our land, I am grateful for this haven.

Lupines in bloom

Lots of apple trees

Your own beach with beach roses and a great view – and perfect for meditative strolls!

The home itself is a historic Cape-style house, built in 1867.  We’ve come to know the families that built the house and lived in it over the last 150 years.  They’re still around, in the village of Welshpool, which we can easily walk to.   Cozy and comfortable, the house served me as an art gallery for ten years.  I’d like to think that another artist might want to live there and do the same.  Although the house is on the main road, it’s far enough away that the house is quiet, and set back enough that the sugar maples and horse chestnut trees make it very private.

Lots of trees

Established gardens

Our resident Great Horned Owls

What else do I love about this location?  I can walk from our beach—which we own down to high tide—to the dock where the US President Franklin D. Roosevelt tied up his sailboat during the summers he spent on the island.  It’s less than a mile from our house.  I’ve sat on Franklin’s dock in the evenings to watch the whales go by in the deep water channel between Campobello and Eastport.  The Roosevelt cottage, which is just a short hike up from the dock, is the centerpiece of the Roosevelt-Campobello International Park.  As a hiker and painter, I’ve come to love the Park’s 3000 acres for its quiet beauty.  The trails also connect with those of the Herring Cove Provincial Park, making for a true wonderland for the painter.

For many reasons, it has come time for Trina and me to part with this property.  (We will not, however, leave the island, since we have family next door, and that is where we will be.)  The property is very reasonably priced for oceanfront; you won’t find a price like this anywhere on coastal Maine or New Brunswick for a property like this.  If you are interested, please visit www.CampobelloHome.com, where you can find all the details plus many photos.

By the way, for 25% down, we will do owner-financing for 15 years.  You can enjoy the good life!—
Michael Chesley Johnson, AIS PSA MPAC PSNM
www.MChesleyJohnson.com

Verrijzenis van Christus


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Wat een mooi Paasfeest! En wat een mooie bijeenkomst! Deze dag bevat zoveel oude en nieuwe mysteries! In deze feestweek of liever vreugdeweek, zijn alle mensen over de hele aarde vol blijdschap, en zelfs de hemelse machten verenigen zich met ons om in vreugde de verrijzenis van de Heer te vieren. De engelen en de aartsengelen jubelen, ze verwachten dat de Koning der hemelen, Christus onze God, terugkomt als overwinnaar van de aarde. Het koor van heiligen jubelt, ze verkondigen “Hem die oprijst uit de schoot van de dageraad” (Ps 110,3), de Christus. De aarde jubelt: het bloed van God heeft haar gewassen. De zee jubelt: de voetstappen van de Heer hebben haar geëerd. Dat elke mens, herboren uit het water en de Heilige Geest, jubele: dat Adam, de eerste mens, overgeleverd aan de oude vloek, jubele…

Niet alleen heeft de verrijzenis van Christus deze feestdag ingesteld, maar ze verschaft ons ook het heil in plaats van het lijden, onsterfelijkheid in plaats van de dood, genezing in plaats van verwondingen, de verrijzenis in plaats van de ondergang. Vroeger vond het mysterie van Pasen plaats in Egypte volgens de rituelen die door de Wet gegeven zijn; het offer van het lam was slechts een teken. Maar vandaag vieren we, volgens het Evangelie, het geestelijk Pasen, welke de dag van verrijzenis is. Daar slachtte men een lam uit de kudde…; hier is het Christus zelf die zich offert als Lam van God. Daar is het een dier uit de schaapskooi; hier gaat het niet om een lam, maar om de herder zelf, die het leven geeft voor zijn schapen (Joh 10,11)… Daar trekt het Hebreeuwse volk door de Rode zee en ze heffen een overwinningshymne aan ter ere van hun verdediger: “Ik wil de Heer zingen, want Hij is hoog verheven” (Ex 15,1).. Hier zingen degenen, die waardig geacht zijn om gedoopt te worden, in hun hart de overwinningshymne: “Een enige Heilige, een enige God, Jezus Christus, in de heerlijkheid van God de Vader. Amen”. “De Heer is Koning, bekleed met majesteit”, roept de profeet uit (Ps 93,1). Het Hebreeuwse volk trok door de Rode zee en aten manna in de woestijn. Vandaag eet men, na uit de doopfontein te komen, het brood dat uit de hemel neerdaalt (Joh 6,51).

Proclus van Constantinopel

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grote Vrijdag


 

 

Welkom op mijn blog met informatie over de

Orthodoxie. Teksten, bezinningen, theologie

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Gezangen uitgevoerd door het koor van de orthodoxe kerk van Gent

 olv. Paul Morreel

 

 

 

 

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Cultural curlews


Last night was pretty special, dinner in the house of good friends Tim and Pauline Higgins who moved to the Llyn peninsula a couple of years ago. One of the guests was a guy, Dafydd David-Hughes who runs a round house.  Dafydd is a story teller, you can’t help but be mesmerised by his voice and ability to draw you in, no matter what he is talking about.  It is an art. I’ll be presenting the curlew in myth, legend and folklore tonight – come along if you can.